Tag: boy

Part V — The Reception

Part V — The Reception

Photo: Paul Jubenvill

Photo: Katie Rose; Edits: Paul Jubenvill

Photo: Paul Jubenvill

Photo: Katie Rose; Edits: Paul Jubenvill

Photo: Katie Rose; Edits: Paul Jubenvill

Photo: Paul Jubenvill

Photo: Katie Rose; Edits: Paul Jubenvill

Photo: Paul Jubenvill

Photo: Katie Rose; Edits: Paul Jubenvill

Photo: Paul Jubenvill

Photo: James Bredenhof; Edits: Paul Jubenvill

Photo: James Bredenhof; Edits: Paul Jubenvill

Photo: Katie Rose; Edits: Paul Jubenvill

Photo: Paul Jubenvill

Photo: James Bredenhof; Edits: Paul Jubenvill

Photo: James Bredenhof; Edits: Paul Jubenvill

Photo: James Bredenhof; Edits: Paul Jubenvill

Photo: Paul Jubenvill

Photo: James Bredenhof; Edits: Paul Jubenvill

Photo: James Bredenhof; Edits: Paul Jubenvill

Photo: Paul Jubenvill

Photo: Paul Jubenvill

Photo: Paul Jubenvill

Photo: James Bredenhof; Edits: Paul Jubenvill

Photo: Katie Rose; Edits: Paul Jubenvill

Photo: Katie Rose; Edits: Paul Jubenvill

Photo: Paul Jubenvill

Photo: James Bredenhof; Edits: Paul Jubenvill

Photo: Katie Rose; Edits: Paul Jubenvill

Photo: Paul Jubenvill

Photo: Paul Jubenvill

Photo: Katie Rose; Edits: Paul Jubenvill

Photo: Paul Jubenvill

Photo: Katie Rose; Edits: Paul Jubenvill

Photo: Paul Jubenvill

Photo: Paul Jubenvill

Photo: Paul Jubenvill

Photo: Paul Jubenvill

Photo: Katie Rose; Edits: Paul Jubenvill

Photo: Katie Rose; Edits: Paul Jubenvill

Photo: James Bredenhof; Edits: Paul Jubenvill

Christmas Fun

Christmas Fun

Family Candid

Family Candid

Boys and Mimzy

Cute Little Family

Cute Little Family

Car Accident

Car Accident

Thinking

Thinking

God is the only audience of your thoughts.

Thoughts are, in one sense, a message to God.

I probably have 2000 photos that would work here, but I just selected a few collections, and chose these, for the story “Thinking.”

Teenager Winter Evening

Teenager Winter Evening

All shots are taken with Fujifilm X-T2; kit lens; Exposure Compensation set to -1 stop, and ISO set to 12800. Exposure restored via editing.

Rolling the Barrel

Rolling the Barrel

ben

The Diefenbunker

The Diefenbunker

Attending their posts at CFS Carp.

Sony SLT-A55V; 1/120s; f/3.5; ISO 400; 50mm
Sony SLT-A55V; 1/120s; f/3.5; ISO 400; 50mm

Boys Conquering

Boys Conquering

Minolta Film; ISO 800

I just realized that I’ve been studying the child’s face all my life.

Sony DSLR-A350; ISO 800
Peek

Peek

1/80s f/4 ISO 80 23.6mm
Chroma Key Green Screen

Chroma Key Green Screen

Tips for using a green screen:

  • while planning or selecting a background image, make sure the image belongs to you, or you have permission to use it– give proper credit when required
  • before you make the photo of your foreground subject, study the background photo you’re going to use; study the lighting in the background photo: where is the light source, what color is the light and how bright is it? you need to reproduce this lighting with your subject to make the final image look believable; of course, this isn’t applicable if your background is just a pattern or solid color
  • maintain as much distance between the subject(s) and the green screen as you can
  • maximize your aperture, without compromising the depth of field you want for your subject, to help blur the green screen
  • technical and lighting setup (click here)
  • Use FXhome PhotoKey or some other professional software to combine the images

(more tips after the image)


Editing tips:

  • spend time reading the instructions for the green screen software; there is a fair bit to learn, but it’s worth it; it will be difficult to do a good job if you’re just playing with the settings
  • while it’s important to see the final result, of course, the Matte View is essential and extremely helpful for working on your image; when you are using Matte View, your goal is to eliminate the grey areas; you want your subject to be white and the background to be black; after importing, rotating, resizing and cropping the background and foreground images, the first thing you should do is switch to Matte View and slide the Gain control until the grey areas are minimized
  • if there are grey areas (green highlights) in your foreground subject:
    • where it’s easy enough, use Masks to retain alpha in your subject
    • otherwise, slide Hue Balance to until you have minimized the problem
  • if there is green reflecting onto a human subject’s skin, change the Spill Suppression method to Extended
  • if the edge of your subject is wrong, these are the settings you need to investigate:
    • Edge Color
    • Erode
  • use the Blur filter to make the noise/grain levels between foreground and background look natural (believable)
  • there is a lot more to learn, but these tips should give you a good start
Update October 2016

Update October 2016

I sold all my Sony/Minolta equipment, and converted to the Fujifilm X-mount system — X-T2 with vertical grip and 3 lenses.

Hoping Fujifilm designs a TTL wireless flash. (December 2016 update: I am using RoboSHOOT with a Nikon speedlight for wireless flash.) Other than that, I love their X-series cameras — good, old fashioned dials, knobs and rings. Definitely makes it easier to quickly change settings without looking at your camera rather than through the more modern touch screens and menus.

Here’s the first photograph I made with the X-T2… obviously, it’s heavily edited, and I deliberately permitted the high noise:

Jacob at the Playground